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 Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration Courses



Graduate Courses

200C.  Leadership Communications. (1)   Four hours of lecture per weekend for seven weeks or three and one-half hours of lecture per week for nine weeks. Leadership communication is a workshop in the fundamentals of public speaking in today's business environment. Through prepared and impromptu speeches aimed at moving others to action, peer coaching, and lectures, students will sharpen their authentic and persuasive communication skills, develop critical listening skills, improve abilities to give, receive, and apply feedback, and gain confidence as public speakers. (F,SP) Staff

200P.  Problem Finding, Problem Solving. (1)   Three hours of lecture per week for eight weeks. The course instructor will decide the grading option when the class is scheduled. Problem Finding, Problem Solving (PFPS) teaches basic skills drawn from the fields of critical thinking, design thinking and systems thinking that support innovation. Specifically, it covers ways of collecting information to characterize a problem, framing and re-framing that problem, coming up with a range of solutions and then gathering feedback to assess those solutions. Following Confucius's notion: "I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand." The class consists primarily of hands-on exercises to experiment with and learn the tools and techniques presented, applying them to the design and testing of alternative business models for start-up and other businesses. (F,SP)

200S.  Data and Decisions. (2)   Four hours of lecture and one and one-half hours of discussion for seven weeks. The objective of this core course is to make students critical consumers of statistical analysis using available software packages. Key concepts include interpretation of regression analysis, model formation and testing, and diagnostic checking. (F,SP) Staff

201A.  Economics for Business Decision Making. (2)   Four hours of lecture per weekend for seven weeks or three and one-half hours of lecture per week for nine weeks. Prerequisites: E204. Formerly Business Administration E201A. This course uses the tools and concepts of microeconomics to analyze decision problems within a business firm. Particular emphasis is placed on the firm's choice of policies in determining prices, inputs usage, and outputs. The effects of the state of the competitive environment on business policies are also examined.

201B.  Macroeconomics in the Global Economy. (2)   Four hours of lecture per weekend for seven weeks or three and one-half hours of lecture per week for nine weeks. Prerequisites: Business Administration E201A. Formerly Business Administration E201B. This course builds on the foundations developed in E201A to develop theories of fiscal policy, monetary policy, and other macro-economic policies. Both the issues and the evidence in connection with these policies will be examined. Other topics covered in the course range from the specifics of the U.S. balance of payments situation to the broader problems associated with economic growth and decay in the world.

202.  Financial Reporting. (2)   Four hours of lecture per weekend for seven weeks or three and one-half hours of lecture per week for nine weeks. Formerly Business Administration E202A. Published financial reports provide the most important single set of data on modern organizations. This course is designed to provide a working knowledge of accounting measurements which are necessary for a clear understanding of published financial reports.

203.  Introduction to Finance. (2)   Four hours of lecture per weekend for seven weeks or three and one-half hours of lecture per week for nine weeks. Formerly Business Administration E203. This course will examine the wide menu of available assets, the institutional structure of U.S. and international financial markets, and the market mechanisms for trading securities. Topics include discounting, capital budgeting, historical behavior of asset returns, and diversification and portfolio theory. Course will also provide introductions to asset pricing theory for primary and derivative assets and to the principles governing corporate financial arrangements and contracting. (F,SP) Staff

204.  Operations. (2)   Four hours of lecture per weekend for seven weeks or three and one-half hours of lecture per week for nine weeks. Prerequisites: Admission to the program. Formerly Business Administration E204. An introduction to the application of quantitative methods to management decision problems. Topics include linear programming, probability theory, decision analysis, regression and correlation, and time series analysis.

205.  Leading People. (2)   Four hours of lecture per weekend for seven weeks or three and one-half hours of lecture per week for nine weeks. Prerequisites: Admission to the program. Formerly Business Administration E205. A survey of knowledge about behavior in and of organizations. Covered will be issues of individual behavior, group functioning, and the actions of organizations in their environments. Problems of work motivation, task design, leadership, communication, organizational design, and innovation will be analyzed from multiple theoretical perspectives. Implications for the management of organizations will be illustrated through examples, cases, and exercises.

205L.  Leadership. (1)   Three hours of lecture for seven weeks. The objective of this course is to help students develop an understanding of their own strengths and weaknesses as leaders and to nurture their confidence to envision themselves as, and aspire to be, leaders throughout their careers. The course will include four main components: 1) 360-degree assessment and an accompanying leadership self-assessment analysis; 2) live cases run by leaders in organizations; 3) advanced practices about leadership; 4) experiential exercises. (F,SP)

206.  Marketing Organization and Management. (2)   Four hours of lecture per weekend for seven weeks or three and one-half hours of lecture per week for nine weeks. Prerequisites: Business Administration E200. Formerly Business Administration E206. Topics include an overview of the marketing system and the marketing concepts, buyer behavior, market research, segmentation and marketing decision making, marketing structures, and evaluation of marketing performance in the economy and society. (F,SP) Staff

207.  Ethics and Responsibility in Business. (1)   Four hours of lecture per weekend for four weeks or three hours of lecture per week for five weeks. Prerequisites: Admission to the program. Formerly Business Administration E207. A study of basic ideas, concepts, attitudes, rules, and institutions in our society that characterize the legal, political, and social framework within which the system operates. (F,SP) Staff

210.  Strategy, Structure, and Incentives. (3)   Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 201A or consent of instructor. This course uses insights from economics to develop structure, tactics, and incentives to achieve the firm's goals. It develops a framework for analyzing organizational architecture, focusing on the allocation of decision rights, the measurement of performance, and the design of incentives. Includes managing the vertical chain of upstream suppliers and downstream distributors, design and operation of incentive and performance management systems, techniques for dealing with informational asymmetries. (F,SP)

211.  Game Theory. (1-3)   Three hours of lecture per week. A survey of the main ideas and techniques of game-theoretic analysis related to bargaining, conflict, and negotiation. Emphasizes the identification and analysis of archetypal strategic situations in bargaining. Goals of the course are to provide a foundation for applying game-theoretic analysis, both formally and intuitively, to negotiation and bargaining; to recognize and assess archetypal strategic situations in complicated negotiation settings; and to feel comfortable in the process of negotiation. (F,SP) Staff

W211.  Game Theory (Online Version). (2,3)   Students will receive no credit for Evening and Weekend Masters in Business Administration W211 after taking Evening and Weekend Masters in Business Administration 211. Seven to ten hours of web-based lecture every other week. A survey of the main ideas and techniques of game-theoretic analysis related to bargaining, conflict, and negotiation. Emphasizes the identification and analysis of archetypal strategic situations in bargaining. Goals of the course are to provide a foundation for applying game-theoretic analysis, both formally and intuitively, to negotiation and bargaining; to recognize and assess archetypal strategic situations in complicated negotiation settings. This course is taught online. (F,SP) Staff

212.  Energy and Environmental Markets. (3)   Three hours of evening lecture per week. Prerequisites: Business Administration E201A or equivalent. Formerly Business Administration E212. Business strategy and public issues in energy and environmental markets. Topics include development and effect of organized spot, futures, and derivative energy markets; political economy of regulation and deregulation; climate change and environmental policies related to energy production and use; cartels, market power and competition policy; pricing of exhaustible resources; competitiveness of alternative energy sources; and transportation and storage of energy commodities.

212A.  Cleantech to Market. (3)   Three hours of lecture per week. In this course, interdisciplinary teams of graduate students work with scientists from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and across the UCB campus to commercialize new solar, biofuel, battery, and smart grid/energy management technologies. Students are drawn from Business, Engineering, Science, Law, and the Energy and Resources Group. Students explore topics such as: Potential application in multiple markets; alignment with target or desired market(s); distinguishing advantages and disadvantages; customer and user profiles; top competitors; commercialization and scale-up challenges; relevant government policies; revenue potential and cost sensitivities; intellectual property issues; and multiple other related topics. (F,SP)

215.  Business Strategies for Emerging Markets: Management, Investment, and Opportunities. (1-3)   One to three hours of lecture per week. This course helps students to study the institutions of emerging markets that are relevant for managers, analyze opportunities presented by emerging markets, analyze the additional ethical challenges and issues of social responsibility common in emerging markets, and learn to minimize the risks in doing business in emerging markets. This course is a combination of lectures, class participation, and cases. (F,SP)

217.  Topics in Economic Analysis and Policy. (.5-3)   Course may be repeated for credit. One-half to three hours of lecture per week. Advanced study in the field of economic analysis and policy. Topics will vary from year to year and will be announced at the beginning of each semester. (F,SP) Staff

218A.  International Finance. (3)   Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Business Administration 201B. Formerly Business Administration E285. This course introduces students to the institutions and operation of the international macroeconomic environment; special attention is paid to international financial arrangements relevant for managers of multinational corporations. Topics include: foreign exchange and capital markets; the balance of payments; open economy macroeconomics; exchange rate determination; history of the international financial system; arbitrage and hedging; international aspects of financial decisions. (F,SP)

222.  Financial Information Analysis. (3)   Three hours of lecture per week. Formerly Business Administration E222. Issues of accounting information evaluation with special emphasis on the use of financial statements by decision makers outside the firm. The implications of recent research in finance and accounting for external reporting issues will be explored. Emphasis will be placed on models that describe the user's decision context. (SP)

223.  Corporate Financial Reporting. (3)   Three hours of evening lecture per week. Prerequisites: Business Administration E202B and E203 or equivalent. Formerly Business Administration E220. Intensive study of the theory and practice of financial accounting. Asset and liability measurement, income determination, financial reporting.

224A.  Managerial Accounting. (2)   Six hours of evening lecture per week for five weeks. Prerequisites: E204. Formerly Business Administration E202B. Management is dependent on an information system which provides dependable, timely, and relevant information to all decision makers. The goal of this course is to identify the information needs of managers and to develop the methods by which managerial accountants can provide the necessary data through appropriate budget, cost, and other informational systems.

227B.  Taxes and Firm Strategy. (3)   Course may be repeated for credit. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Business Administration E202A and E202B or equivalents. Formerly Business Administration E228. This course will cover various topics in personal or corporate taxation or both. Topics will vary from semester to semester. (F,SP) Staff

231.  Corporate Finance. (3)   Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Business Administration E230. Formerly Business Administration E234. Financial policies of firms including asset acquisition and replacement, capital structure, dividends, working capital, and mergers. Development of theory and application to financial management decisions. (F,SP)

232.  Financial Institutions and Markets. (3)   Three hours of evening lecture per week. Prerequisites: Business Administration E201B and E203 or E230. Formerly Business Administration E232. Structure and operation of the Federal Reserve System commercial bank and non-bank financial institutions. Impact of monetary policy and of public regulation. Portfolio composition amd market behavior of financial intermediaries. Organization and functions of money markets. The structure of yields on financial assets and the influence of financial intermediaries and monetary policy.

233.  Asset Management. (3)   Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week. Prerequisites: Evening and Weekend Masters in Business Administration 203. This course will analyze the role of financial markets and financial institutions in allocating capital. The major focus will be on debt contracts and securities and on innovations in the bond and money markets. The functions of commercial banks, investment banks, and other financial intermediaries will be covered, and aspects of the regulation of these institutions will be examined. (F,SP)

236A.  Corporate Risk Management and Valuation Using Derivatives. (2)   Course may be repeated for credit. Two hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Evening and Weekend Masters in Business Administration 233. This course concentrates on topics pertaining to financial risks faced by corporations, in particular, the topics of "hedging" and "valuation." The course will consider the following type of question. What risks does a firm face? Should it hedge any of these risks? If so, how should the firm implement the hedge, i.e., using what instruments, and in what quantity? The main tool that the course will make use of is financial derivatives. An important aspect of the study of derivatives is the valuation method, which provides an understanding of the market prices and can be used to evaluate investment opportunities, corporate securities, and others. The course will consist of a mixture of lectures and case discussions. (F,SP)

236B.  Investment Strategies and Styles. (2)   Course may be repeated for credit. Two hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Business Administration E203 plus one additional graduate finance course. Formerly Business Administration E239. Introduction to alternative investment strategies and styles as practiced by leading money managers. A money manager will spend approximately half of the class discussing his general investment philosophy. In the other half, students, practitioner, and instructor will explore the investment merits of one particular company. Students will be expected to use the library's resources, class handouts, and their ingenuity to address a set of questions relating to the firm's investment value. (F,SP) Staff

236C.  Global Financial Services. (3)   Three hours of lecture per week. Survey of the forces changing and shaping global finance and intermediation, especially the effects of greater ease of communication, deregulation and globalized disciplines expected to continue to be essential to corporate finance and intermediation, e.g., investment analysis, valuation, structured finance/securitization, and derivative applications. The case method is utilized with occasional additional assigned readings and text sources. (F,SP) Staff

236D.  Portfolio Management. (3)   Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 203 or consent of instructor. This course explores the broad range of portfolio management in practice. The class will examine the assets, strategies, characteristics, operations, and concerns unique to each type of portfolio. Practitioners will present descriptions of their businesses as well as methods and strategies that they employ. (F,SP) Staff

236E.  Mergers and Acquisitions: A Focus on Creating Value. (2)   Two hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Evening and Weekend Masters in Business Administration 203 or consent of instructor. Survey of the day-to-day practices and techniques used in change of control transaction. Topics include valuation, financing, deal structuring, tax and accounting considerations, agreements, closing documents, practices used in management buyouts, divestitures, hostile takeovers, and takeover defenses. Also covers distinctions in technology M&A, detecting corruption in cross border transaction attempts, and betting on deals through risk arbitrage. Blend of lectures, case studies, and guest lectures. (F,SP) Staff

236F.  Behavioral Finance. (1-3)   Three hours of lecture for fifteen weeks. Five to fourteen hours of lecture per week for three weeks. Prerequisites: 203. This course looks at the influence of decision heuristics and biases on investor welfare, financial markets, and corporate decisions. Topics include overconfidence, attribution theory, representative heuristic, availability heuristic, anchoring and adjustment, prospect theory, "Winner's Curse," speculative bubbles, IPOs, market efficiency, limits of arbitrage, relative mis-pricing of common stocks, the tendency to trade in a highly correlated fashion, investor welfare, and market anomalies. (F,SP) Staff

236G.  Designing Financial Models that Work. (1,2)   One to two hours of lecture for fourteen weeks. Prerequisites: 203 or consent of instructor. Spreadsheet financial models are often too big, complicated, and buggy to help people. In this course, students learn to design financial models that work because they're small (fit on a screen or two), straightforward (involve basic math), clear (a non-MBA can follow them readily), and fast to build. These simple yet powerful representations of the cash flow for a new product/deal/venture help people share their vision, recognize tradeoffs, brainstorm possibilities, and make decisions. (F,SP) Staff

236H.  Financial Statement Modeling for Finance Careers. (1,2)   One to two hours of lecture per week for 15 weeks. One and one-half to three hours of lecture per week for ten weeks. Two to three and one-half hours of lecture per week for eight weeks. Two and one-half to five hours of lecture per week for six weeks. Prerequisites: 203 or consent of instructor. Spreadsheet financial models are often too big, complicated, and buggy to help people. In this course, students learn to design financial models that work because they're small (fit on a screen or two), straightforward (involve basic math), clear (a non-MBA can follow them readily), and fast to build. These simple yet powerful representations of the cash flow for a new product/deal/venture help people share their vision, recognize tradeoffs, brainstorm possibilities, and make decisions. (F,SP) Staff

237.  Topics in Finance. (.5-3)   Course may be repeated for credit. One-half to three hours of lecture per week. Advanced study in the field of Finance. Topics will vary from year to year and will be announced at the beginning of each semester. (F,SP)

240.  Risk Management via Optimization and Simulation. (1)   Seven hours of lecture for two weeks. Prerequisites: 203 and 204, or consent of instructor. Survey of the formulation, solution, and interpretation of mathematical models to assist management of risk. Emphasis on applications from diverse businesses and industries, including inventory management, product distribution, portfolio optimization, portfolio insurance, and yield management. Two types of models are covered: optimization and simulation. Associated with each model type is a piece of software: Excel's Solver for optimization and Excel add-in Crystal Ball for simulation. (F,SP)

246A.  Service Strategy. (3)   Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 204 or Master of Business Administration 204 or consent of instructor. This course is designed to teach general management principles involved in the planning, execution, and management of service businesses. It covers both strategic and tactical aspects, including the development of a strategic service vision, building employee loyalty, developing customer loyalty and satisfaction, improving productivity and service quality, service innovation, and the role of technology in services. Blend of case studies, group projects, class discussions, and selected readings. (F,SP) Staff

247.  Topics in Operations and Information Technology Management. (.5-3)   Course may be repeated for credit. One-half to three hours of lecture per week. Formerly Eve/Wknd Masters in Bus. Adm. 247A. Advanced study in the field of Manufacturing and Operations. Topics will vary from year to year and will be announced at the beginning of each semester. (F,SP)

248A.  Supply Chain Management. (3)   Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 204 or Master of Business Administration 204 or equivalent. Supply chain management concerns the flow of materials and information in multistage production and distribution networks. This course provides knowledge of organizational models and analytical decision support tools necessary to design, implement, and sustain successful supply chain strategies. Topics include demand and supply management, inventory management, supplier-buyer coordination via incentives, vendor management, and the role of information technology in supply chain management. (F,SP) Staff

252.  Negotiations and Conflict Resolution. (2,3)   Two to three hours of lecture per week. The purpose of this course is for students to understand the theory and processes of negotiation so that they can negotiate successfully in a variety of settings. This course is designed to complement the technical and diagnostic skills learned in other courses in the MBA program. (F,SP)

254.  Power and Politics in Organizations. (2,3)   Two to three hours of lecture per week. This course will provide students with a sense of "political intelligence." After taking this course, students will be able to: (1) diagnose the true distribution of power in organizations, (2) identify strategie for building sources of power, (3) develop techniques for influencing others, (4) understand the role of power in building cooperation and leading change in organizations, and (5) make sense of others' attempts to influence them. These skills are essential for effective and satisfying career building. (F,SP) Staff

W254.  Power and Politics in Organizations. (2)   Four hours of web-based lecture for eight weeks. Prerequisites: Master of Business Administration 205. This course will provide students with a sense of "political intelligence," enabling them to: 1) Diagnose the true distribution of power in organizations, 2) Identify strategies for building sources of power, 3) Develop techniques for influencing others, 4) Understand the role of power in building cooperation and leading change, and 5) Make sense of others' attempts to influence them. This is an online course, utilizing multiple media and providing flexibility in when and how students learn. (F,SP) Anderson

255.  Leadership. (1-3)   One to three hours of lecture per week. This course will increase your awareness of your own strengths and opportunities for improvement while gaining an understanding of the qualities essential to being an extraordinary leader. By the end of the course, we are hoping that you will have: Increased your understanding of what distinguishes between more and less successful leaders and construct a plan for your own development as a leader; sharpened your ability to diagnose situations and determine how you can add value; gained experience and confidence in leadership situations, such as dealing with difficult people and inspiring others to accomplish shared team and organizational goals; and developed the ability to accept and leverage feedback and offer useful feedback to others. (F,SP)

256.  Global Leadership. (3)   Three hours of lecture per week. Practical skills for global managers. Examines common issues and best practices for managing a global workforce and customer/partner relations. Generic cross-border management issues are discussed along with specific skill areas such as establishing credibility, building relationships, obtaining information, evaluating people, giving and receiving feedback, leading a virtual team, marketing and selling, transferring knowledge, and managing change. Skill areas are applied and adapted to key growth markets in Asia, EMEA, and the Americas, with numerous examples from leading global companies. (F,SP)

257.  Special Topics in the Management of Organizations. (.5-3)   Course may be repeated for credit. One-half to three hours of lecture per week. Advanced study in the field of Organizational Behavior and Industrial Relations. Topics will vary from year to year and will be announced at the beginning of each semester. (F,SP)

258A.  International Business: Designing Global Organizations. (3)   Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 205. This course is about flexible organizational designs and adaptive leadership strategies in global markets. It will be of special interest to students working in high tech, life sciences and biotechnology, telecommunications, management consulting, and financial services. Topics include new trends in global organizational design, leading geo-dispersed teams of knowledge workers, managing offshore partnerships, integrating acquisitions, and executing change with multicultural knowledge workers. (F,SP) Staff

260.  Consumer Insights. (3)   Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Business Administration E206 or equivalent. Formerly Business Administration E260. Examines concepts and theories from behavioral science useful for the understanding and prediction of marketplace behavior and demand analysis. Emphasizes applications to the development of marketing policy planning and strategy and to various decision areas within marketing. (F,SP)

261.  Marketing Research: Tools and Techniques for Data Collection and Analysis. (2-3)   Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Business Administration 200 or comparable statistical course. Formerly Business Administration E261. This course develops the skills necessary to plan and implement an effective market research study. Topics include research design, psychological measurement, survey methods, experimentation, statistical analysis of marketing data, and effective reporting of technical material to management. Students select a client and prepare a market research study during the course. Course intended for students with substantive interests in marketing. (F,SP) Staff

262.  Strategic Brand Management. (3)   Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Business Administration E206. Formerly Business Administration E262A. The focus of this course is on developing student skills to formulate and critique complete marketing programs including product, price, distribution, and promotion policies. Case analyses are heavily used. The course is designed primarily for students who will take a limited number of advanced marketing courses and wish an integrated approach. (F,SP) Staff

263.  Marketing Analytics. (3)   Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Business Administration E206. Formerly Business Administration E262B. Information technology has allowed firms to gather and process large quantities of information about consumers' choices and reactions to marketing campaigns. However, few firms have the expertise to intelligently act on such information. This course addresses this shortcoming by teaching students how to use customer information to better market to consumers. In addition, the course addresses how information technology affects marketing strategy. (F,SP) Staff

264.  High Technology Marketing Management. (3)   Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Business Administration E206 or equivalent. Formerly Business Administration E264. High technology refers to that class of products and services which is subject to technological change at a pace significantly faster than for most goods in the economy. Under such circumstances, the marketing task faced by the high technology firm differs in some ways from the usual. The purpose of this course is to explore these differences. (SP) Staff

265.  . (2-3)   Two to three hours of lecture per week. A specialized course in advertising, focusing on management and decision-making. Topics include objective-setting, copy decisions, media decisions, budgeting, and examination of theories, models, and other research methods appropriate to these decision areas. Other topics include social/economic issues of advertising by nonprofit organizations. (F,SP) Staff

266.  Sales Force Management and Channel Strategy. (3)   Three hours of lecture per week. The success of any marketing program often weighs heavily upon its co-execution by members of the firm's distribution channel. This course seeks to provide an understanding of how the strategic and tactical roles of the channel can be identified and managed. This is accomplished, first, through studying the broad economic and social forces that govern the channel evolution. It is completed through the examination of tools to select, manage, and motivate channel partners. (F,SP)

267.  Topics in Marketing. (.5-3)   Course may be repeated for credit. One-half to three hours of lecture per week. Advanced study in the field of Marketing. Topics will vary from year to year and will be announced at the beginning of each semester. (F,SP)

268B.  International Marketing. (3)   Three hours of lecture per week. Provides frameworks, knowledge; and sensitivities to formulate and implement marketing strategies for competing in the international arena. Regions and countries covered include the Americas, Europe, Japan, China, India, Russia, Africa, and Asia-Pacific. Issues covered include global versus local advertising, international pricing strategies, selecting and managing strategic international alliances and distribution channels, managing international brands and product lines through product life cycle, international retailing, and internatiional marketing organization and control. (F,SP)

268C.  Social Media Marketing. (1-3)   One to three hours of lecture per week. The course covers the implications of the evolution of communication on marketing strategy in the new landscape where traditional and digital media coexist and interact. While advertising spending on traditional media has recently declined, increasing amounts are spent online in addition to unpaid media. These new communication channels, however, are presenting significant challenges to marketers in selecting the best strategies to maximize returns. The course covers a number of topics including, but not limited to: The differences and interaction between traditional and social media; two-sided markets and social media platforms; a basic theory of social networks online and offline; consumer behavior and digital media. (F,SP)

269.  Pricing. (3)   Three hours of lecture per week. This three-module course aims to equip students with proven concepts, techniques, and frameworks for assessing and formulating pricing strategies. The first module develops the economic and behavorial foundations of pricing. The second module discusses several innovative pricing concepts including price customization, nonlinear pricing, price matching, and product line pricing. The third module analyzes the strengths and weaknesses of several Internet-based, buyer-determined pricing models. (F,SP) Staff

273.  Dynamic Capabilities. (2-3)   Three to four hours of lecture per week. This is a course in strategic management. It draws on a variety of disciplines and integrates them in the fashion that will generate key insights into how technology can be developed and managed. This course will help students acquire and practice concepts and skills that are relevant to management in a technologically dynamic environment. It provides frameworks for intellectual capital management in the private sector. This course is aimed at those interested in working for either large or small firms in technologically progressive industries, as well as those wishing to understand how mature industries can create and respond to innovation. (F,SP)

275.  Business Law: Managing the Legal Environment. (3)   Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Completion of all core courses or consent of instructor. A manager must understand the legal environments which impact business and understand how to work effectively with lawyers. This course addresses the legal aspects of business relationships and business agreements. Topics covered include forms of business organization, duties of officers and directors, intellectual property, antitrust, contracts, employment relationships, criminal law, and debtor-creditor relationships including bankruptcy. (F,SP) Staff

277.  Special Topics in Business and Public Policy. (1-3)   One to three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Business Administration E207 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. Formerly Business Administration E278. Topics vary by semester at discretion of instructor and by student demand. Topical areas include business and professional ethics and the role of corporate social responsibility in the mixed economy; managing the external affairs of the corporation, including community, government, media and stakeholder relations; technology policy, research and development, and the effects of government regulation of business on technological innovation and adoption. (F,SP) Staff

280.  Real Estate Investment and Market Analysis. (3)   Three hours of lecture per week. Formerly Business Administration E280. Intensive review of literature in the theory of land utilization, urban growth and real estate market behavior; property rights and valuation; residential and non-residential markets; construction, debt and equity financing; public controls and policies.

282.  Real Estate Development. (3)   Course may be repeated for credit. Three and one-half hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Formerly Business Administration 282. The interaction of the private and public sectors in urban development; modeling the urban economy; growth and decline of urban areas; selected policy issues: housing, transportation, financing, local government, urban redevelopment, and neighborhood change are examined. (F) Staff

283.  Real Estate Finance and Securitization. (3)   Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Business Administration E280; and background in the basics of finance, micro-economics, macro-economics, statistics and quantitative analysis. Formerly Business Administration E283. Students will be introduced to the fundamentals of real estate financial analysis, including elements of mortgage financing and taxation. The course will apply the standard tools of financial analysis to specialized real estate financing circumstances and real estate evaluation. (F,SP) Staff

284.  Real Estate Investment Strategy. (3)   Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Formerly Business Administration E284. Analysis of selected problems and special studies; cases in residental and non-residental development and financing, urban redevelopment, real estate taxation, mortgage market developments, equity investment, valuation, and zoning.

287.  Special Topics in Real Estate Economics and Finance. (1-3)   Course may be repeated for credit. One hour of lecture per week per unit. Prerequisites: Business Administration E280 and consent of instructor. Formerly Business Administration E281. Topics vary each semester. Topic areas include advanced techniques for real estate financial analysis and structuring and evaluation; the securitization of real estate debt and equity; issues in international real estate; cyclical behavior of real estate markets; portfolio theory and real estate asset allocation. (F,SP) Staff

290B.  Biotechnology Industry Perspectives and Business Development. (2)   Course may be repeated for credit. Two hours of lecture per week. This course is designed to examine the strategic issues that confront the management of the development-stage biotech company, i.e., after its startup via an initial capital infusion, but before it might be deemed successful, or otherwise has achieved "first-tier" status. The intention is to study the biotech organization during the process of its growth and maturation from an early-stage existence through "adolescence" into an early-stage existence. (F,SP) Staff

290H.  Haas@Work. (3)   Three hours of lecture per week. The primary objective of this course and the associated innovation consulting projects is for students to learn and apply the approaches, skills, and behaviors required to successfully initiate and drive innovation in a complex organization. Students taking the course will use concepts and tools from several other Haas courses, including Economic Analysis for Business Decisions, Strategic Leadership, Leading People, Finance, and Problem Finding Problem Solving. As important, the student teams are expected to deliver the highest quality work and deliverables, genuine insights, innovative solutions, and real value on mission-critical client projects. (F,SP)

290I.  Managing Innovation and Change. (3)   Three hours of lecture per week. Formerly Business Administration E274. This course is designed to introduce students to the innovation process and its management. It provides an overview of technological change and links it to specific strategic challenges; examines the diverse elements of the innovation process and how they are managed; discusses the uneasy relationship between technology and the workforce; and examines challenges of managing innovation globally. (F,SP)

290K.  Innovation in Services and Business Models. (2)   Two hours of lecture per week. This course examines services innovation, first covering key concepts, including how services innovation differs from product innovation, the role of openness in services, the role of business models, and co-creation. The course then introduces several tools and frameworks to apply those concepts to specific services situations. These include process design, process mapping and improvement, business models, co-creation, and platform innovation. (F,SP) Chesbrough

290S.  Strategy for the Information Technology Firm. (3)   Three hours of lecture per week. This course is a strategy and general management course for students interested in pursuing careers in the global information technology industry. Students are taught to view the IT industry through the eyes of the general manager/CEO (whether at a start-up or an industry giant). They learn how to evaluate strategic options and their consequences, how to understand the perspectives of various industry players, and how to anticipate how they are likely to behave under various circumstances. These include the changing economics of production, the role network effects and standards have on adoption of new products and services, the tradeoffs among potential pricing strategies, and the regulatory and public policy context. (F,SP)

290T.  Special Topics in Innovation and Design. (.5-3)   Course may be repeated for credit. One-half to three hours of lecture per week. Advanced study in the fields of innovation and design. Topics will vary from year to year and will be announced at the beginning of each semester. (F,SP)

290V.  Corporate Strategy in Telecommunications and Media. (3)   Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Business Administration 204. This course is intended for students who wish to gain better understanding of one of the most important issues facing management today--designing, implementing, and managing telecommunication and distributed computer systems. The following topics are covered: a survey of networking technologies; the selection, design, and management of telecommunication systems; strategies for distributed data processing; office automation; and management of personal computers in organizations. (F,SP)

291C.  Active Communicating. (1)   Eight hours of lecture for two weeks. This course develops the basic building blocks of impactful communication--e.g., concentration, energy, voice, physical expressiveness, spontaneity, listening, awareness, and presence--by drawing upon expertise from theater arts. Active, participatory exercises allow for the development and embodiment of effective communication skills. Class readings, lectures, and discussions address participants' specific workplace applications. (F,SP)

291D.  Data Visualization for Discovery and Communication. (1)   Eight hours of lecture for two weeks. This course exposes the problems of poor data presentation and introduces design practices necessary to communicate quantitative business information clearly, efficiently, and powerfully. This course identifies what to look for in the data and describes the types of graphs and visual analysis techniques most effective for spotting what is meaningful and making sense of it. (F,SP)

291I.  Improvisational Leadership. (3)   Three hours of lecture per week. This class explores the broad principles of improvisation, a performing art form that has developed pedagogical methods to enhance individual spontaneity, listening and awareness, expressive skills, risk-taking, and one's ability to make authentic social and emotional connections. The ultimate aim of the course is to help students develop an innovative and improvisational leadership mindset, sharpening in-the-moment decision making and the ability to quickly recognize and act upon opportunities when presented. In practical terms, this course strives to enhance students' business communication skills and increase both interpersonal intuition and confidence. (F,SP) Staff

291L.  Leader as Coach. (1)   One hour of lecture per week. This course focuses on the art and science of coaching including theory and practice. The curriculum will cover theory and practice for three aspects of the coaching process - knowledge-based (information and skills), motivation-based (inspiration and passion), and strategy-based (communication and integration). The curriculum will focus on primary coaching skills, tools, processes and behaviors that a coach uses. In addition, participants will learn facilitation skills as the preferred methodology in achieving successful coaching programs. Course participants will have the opportunity to utilize this material in practice coaching sessions with supervision and feedback from peers and the instructor. (F,SP)

291S.  Storytelling for Leadership. (1)   Two hours of lecture every other week. This course provides students with personal leadership development through the ability to tell "Who Am I" leadership journey stories, for use in the business context. For leaders, whose job it is to manage change, the approach to storytelling facilitates learning and is a vehicle to assist others in overcoming obstacles, generating enthusiasm and team work, sharing knowledge and ultimately leading to build trust and connection. This course give strategies, skills and practices for the three elements of telling powerful leadership stories: Story Content, Story Structure and Story Delivery. The course is highly interactive. (F,SP) Staff

291T.  Topics In Managerial Communications. (1-3)   Course may be repeated for credit. One to three hours of lecture per week. Formerly Business Administration 291B. This course will provide the student with specialized knowledge in some area of managerial communications. Topics include multimedia business presentations, personal leadership development, diversity management, and making meetings work. Topics will vary from semester to semester. (F,SP) Staff

292A.  Strategic Management of Nonprofit Organizations. (2,3)   Two to three hours of lecture per week. This course prepares students conceptually and practically to create, lead, and manage nonprofit organizations. Focuses on the centrality of the mission, governing board leadership, application of strategy and strategic planning, and strategic management of issues unique to or characteristic of the sector: performance measurement, program development, financial management, resource development, community relations and marketing, human resource management, advocacy, and management. (F,SP) Staff

292B.  Nonprofit Boards. (1)   Eight hours of lecture for two weeks. The purpose of this class is to acquaint Evening & Weekend Master of Business Administration students, many of whom will be asked to serve on nonprofit boards throughout their careers, with the nonprofit sector and the roles and responsibilities of nonprofit boards. Students will learn why nonprofit boards exist, how they are structured, how they differ from corporate boards, what their legal responsibilities are, how boards and chief executives relate to each other, and how boards contribute to the effectiveness of nonprofit organizations. (F,SP)

292C.  Strategic and Sustainable Business Solutions. (1-3)   One to three hours of lecture per week. This course explores the concept and practice of corporate sustainability (CS) and corporate social responsibility (CSR) through a series of lectures, guest speakers, and live consulting projects focused on CS and CSR challenges facing actual companies. The course provides the tools and experiences that sustainable management practitioners can utilize as a part of their value-creating strategies. Viewing CS and CSR from a corporate strategy perspective enables students to understand how considerations of social impact can, in fact, support core business objectives, core competencies, and bottom-line profits. (F,SP) Staff

292F.  Strategic Financial Management of Nonprofit Organizations. (1)   Eight hours of lecture for two weeks. Prerequisites: Evening and Weekend Masters in Business Administration 203, financial experience, or equivalent. The course focuses on financial management issues faced by board members and senior and executive managers in nonprofit organizations. Students learn tools and techniques for effective planning and budgeting and how to control, evaluate and revise plans. Use and development of internal and external financial reports are studied with an emphasis on using financial information in decision making. Tools and techniques of financial statement analysis, interpretation, and presentation are practiced. (F,SP)

292I.  Social Investing--Recent Findings in Management and Finance. (1)   Two hours of lecture per week for eight weeks or eight hours of lecture per day on two Sundays. This course introduces the field of social investment. The use of ESG (environmental, social, and governance) criteria is becoming increasingly prevalent among both high net worth individuals and institutions. Many ethical and religious traditions advocate altruism and community-mindedness in all dealings, while some economic and financial theorists argue for a narrow focus on risk and reward, with little regard for the impact of decisions on stakeholder groups or the environment. (F,SP) Kurtz

292J.  Haas Socially Responsible Investment Fund. (2)   Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 units. Two hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Evening and Weekend Masters in Business Administration 292I. In this course, students manage a real investment fund ($1.7 million +) focused on both social and financial returns. Through the Fund students have the opportunity to test the investment and corporate responsibility principles they have learned in the classroom, and to experience the complexities, challenges, and rewards of the investing world. Students have full responsibility for investment decisions, including conducting their own research on companies' environmental, social and governance (ESG) performance. Students receive guidance from both a faculty advisor and an advisory board. The faculty advisor provides regular input on portfolio management, understanding portfolio performance and ESG investing. (F,SP)

292N.  Topics in Nonprofit and Public Management. (1-3)   One to three hours of lecture per week. Formerly Evening and Weekend Master in Business Administration 292M. Advanced study in the field of nonprofit and public management. Topics will vary from year to year and will be announced at the beginning of each semester. (F,SP) Staff

292S.  Social Sector Solutions: Social Enterprise. (3)   Three and one-half hours of lecture per week. The purpose of this course is to develop students' skills and knowledge in problem solving, management consulting, and nonprofit organizations. Instruction covers frameworks for problem solving, senior management consulting, and assessing nonprofit organizations. The course includes an assignment to a consultation team that works with a select nonprofit client to help them succeed in an entrepreneurial venture. A partnership with a professional management consulting firm, McKinsey & Company, the course includes experienced McKinsey consultants coaching each of the student teams. (F,SP)

292T.  Topics in Socially Responsible Business. (.5-3)   Course may be repeated for credit. One-half to three hours of lecture per week. Advanced study in the field of Socially Responsible Business. Topics will vary from year to year and will be announced at the beginning of each semester. (F,SP)

293.  Individually Supervised Study for Graduate Students. (1-5)   Course may be repeated for credit. One to five hours of independent study per week. The course instructor will decide the grading option when the class is scheduled. Individually supervised study of subjects not available to the student in the regular schedule, approved by faculty adviser as appropriate for the student's program. (F,SP) Staff

293C.  Curricular Practical Training Internship.   Course may be repeated. Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. This is an independent study course for international students doing internships under the Curricular Practical Training program. Requires a paper exploring how the theoretical constructs learned in MBA courses were applied during the internship. (F,SP) Gent

295A.  Entrepreneurship. (3)   Three hours of evening lecture per week. Prerequisites: Business Administration E206. Formerly Business Administration E295. The development of creative marketing strategies for new ventures, as well as the resolution of specific marketing problems in smaller companies which provide innovative goods and services. Emphasis is on decision making under conditions of weak data, inadequate resources, emerging markets, and rapidly changing environments. (F,SP)

295B.  Venture Capital and Private Equity. (3)   Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 295A and 234 recommended. This is an advanced case-based course intended to provide the background, tools, and themes of the venture capital industry. The course is organized in four modules of the private equity cycle: (1) fund raising -- examines how private equity funds are raised and structured, (2) investing -- considers the interactions between private equity investors and the entrepreneurs that they finance, (3) exiting -- examines the process through which private equity investors exit their investments; and (4) new frontiers -- reviews many of the key ideas developed in the course. (F,SP) Staff

295D.  New Venture Finance. (2-3)   Course may be repeated for credit. Three and one-half hours of lecture per week. This is a course about financing new entrepreneurial ventures, emphasizing those that have the possibility of creating a national or international impact or both. It will take two perspectives--the entrepreneur's and the investor's- and it will place a special focus on the venture capital process, including how they are formed and managed, accessing the public markets, mergers, and strategic alliances. (F,SP) Staff

295E.  Case Studies in Entrepreneurship. (2)   Two hours of lecture per week. This course integrates the learnings from summer entrepreneurships into academic experience. Classes will include development of an analysis of cases based on the internship, and opportunities to meet with management of the host programs. By the end of the semester, students will better understand what it takes to run an entrepreneurial enterprise. (F,SP) Staff

295F.  The Lean Launch Pad. (2)   Two hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Graduate standing. This course provides real world, hands-on learning on what it's like to actually start a high-tech company. This class is not about how to write a business plan. It's not an exercise on how smart you are in a classroom, or how well you use the research library to size markets. And the end result is not a PowerPoint slide deck for a VC presentation. And it is most definitely not an incubator where you come to build the "hot-idea" that you have in mind. This is a practical class: Our goal, within the constraints of a classroom and a limited amount of time, is to create an entrepreneurial experience for you with all of the pressures and demands of the real world in an early stage start up. (F,SP)

295G.  Investing in Entrepreneurial Opportunities: Building an Investment Screen, Methodology, and Process. (2)   Two hours of lecture per week. This course will provide students with an education in to the complexities and unique problems of entrepreneurship in companies with great growth potential, but that are facing significant challenges to achieving that potential. This class is designed to provide students with the tools and skills most critical to successfully screening, investing in, and/or leading companies that have both a great set future growth opportunities and a great set of current problems. This class will use case studies, practical valuation and other exercises, and the energy, enthusiasm, and intellectual capacity of its students to create a great learning environment. (F,SP) Staff

295I.  Entrepreneurship Workshop for Startups. (2)   Two hours of lecture per week. This workshop is intended for students who have their own experimental venture project under development. The business concept may be in the startup mode or further along in its evolution. The pedagogy is one of guided entrepreneurship where students, often working in teams, undertake the real challenges of building a venture. Students must be willing to discuss their projects with others in the workshop, as group deliberation of the entrepreneurial challenges is a key component of the class. (F,SP) Staff

295M.  Business Model Innovation and Entrepreneurial Strategy. (2)   Two hours of lecture per week for 15 weeks. Three and one-half hours of lecture per week for 10 weeks. The course teaches how to characterize and analyze business models and how to efficiently construct and test new business models. The course examines businesses across industries and phases of a firm's growth. Critical entrepreneurial strategies are illuminated for new ventures or in building a new enterprise inside a corporation. The course provides students with the skills and knowledge to rapidly assess and shape business models to their advantage in constructing new enterprises. (F,SP) Charron

295T.  Topics in Entrepreneurship. (.5-3)   Course may be repeated for credit. One-half to three hours of lecture per week. Advanced study in the field of entrepreneurship. Topics will vary from year to year and will be announced at the beginning of each semester. (F,SP) Staff

296.  Special Topics in Business Administration. (1-3)   Course may be repeated for credit. One unit credit represents one hour of lecture per week. One unit credit represents two hours of lecture per week for eight weeks. The course instructor will decide the grading option when the class is scheduled. Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Advanced study in various fields of business administration. Topics will vary from year to year and will be announced at the beginning of each semester. (F,SP) Staff

297A.  Healthcare in the 21st Century. (3)   Course may be repeated for credit. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Master's level accounting and finance. This course gives a systematic overview of the U.S. health care system by providing students with an understanding of its structure, financing, and special properties. Applies social science theory, disciplinary contributions, and research findings to the understanding of health care delivery problems; examines current courses of data about health status, health services use, financing, and performance indicators; analyzes the larger management and policy issues that drive reform efforts. (F,SP) Staff

298S.  Seminar in International Business. (2,3)   Four to five and one-half hours of fieldwork per week for eight weeks. This course involves a series of speaker and seminar-type classes in preparation for a two-week study tour of a specific country or region. Participants will visit companies and organizations and meet with top-level management to learn about the opportunities and challenges of operating in a specific country or region. Evaluation is based on student presentations, participation, and a research paper. (F,SP) Staff

298X.  EWMBA Exchange Program. (1-15)   Course may be repeated for credit. One to fifteen hours of lecture per week. Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Successful completion of all core courses; good academic standing. Students who participate in one of the Haas School's domestic or international exchange programs receive credit (usually 12 units) at Haas for the set of courses that they successfully complete at their host school. The courses that the students take at the host school are subject to review by the EWMBA Program office to ensure that they match course requirements at the Haas School. (F,SP) Staff

299.  Strategic Leadership. (2)   Four hours of lecture per week for seven weeks or three and one-half hours of lecture per week for eight weeks. Prerequisites: 201A. Course covers core topics in strategy, including selection of goals; the choice of products and services to offer; competitive positioning in product markets; decisions about scope and diversity; and the design of organizational structure, administrative systems, and other issues of control and internal regulation. (SP) La Blanc

299B.  Global Strategy and Multinational Enterprise. (2,3)   Two to three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: All core courses. Formerly Business Administration E286. Identifies the management challenges facing international firms. Attention to business strategies, organizational structures, and the role of governments in the global environment. Special attention to the challenges of developing and implementing global new product development strategies when industrial structures and government policies differ. Efficacy of joint ventures and strategic alliances. Implications for industrial policy and global governance. (F,SP) Staff

299E.  Competitive Strategy. (1-3)   Three and one-half hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Business Administration E201A, E201B, E204. Formerly Business Administration E210. Examines optimal production and pricing policies for firms in competitive environments; optimal strategies through time; strategies in the presence of imperfect information. How differing market structures and government policies (including taxation) affect output and pricing decisions. Social welfare implications of decisions by competitive firms also explored. (F,SP)

299M.  Marketing Strategy. (3)   Three hours of evening seminar per week. Prerequisites: Business Administration E202B, E203, E205, E206. Formerly Business Administration E267. Strategic planning theory and methods with an emphasis on customer, competitor, industry and environmental analysis and its application to strategy development and choice. (F,SP)

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